The City of Sioux Falls has created an online resource for residents impacted by Thursday's (May 12) devastating storms.

SiouxFalls.org/Storm has information on debris cleanup, power outages, and tips for dealing with the aftermath of the storms, which saw the city deal with widespread destruction in the wake of wind gusts approaching 80 miles per hour.

National Weather Service
a widespread, long-lived wind storm that is associated with a band of rapidly moving showers or thunderstorms'
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As of Friday (May 13) afternoon, Xcel Energy was reporting 296 power outages in Sioux Falls, impacting 5.484 households in the city.

Sioux Falls Storm Recovery Website
SiouxFalls.org/Storm
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According to the city's storm website, homeowners are responsible for the removal of debris on their property, but if the debris is in the 'right of way' zone, between the sidewalks, or in the street, the city is responsible for the cleanup.

To help with the disposal of debris, the city has established three temporary drop off locations, which will be operational until May 22:

  • 12th and Lyons (wood debris only)
    100 North Lyon Boulevard
    Open Monday – Sunday: 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Sioux Falls Regional Sanitary Landfill
    26750 464th Avenue
    Open Monday – Sunday: 7:30 AM - 5:00 PM.
  • Mueller Pallet (wood debris only)
    27163 471st Avenue
    Open Monday – Friday: 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Saturday 7:00 AM - Noon

The website also has a section devoted to storm recovery tips, information, and frequently asked questions on topics like:

  • Branches and Tree Debris
  • Chainsaw Safety
  • Cleanup Assistance
  • Downed Trees
  • Power Outage
  • Power Lines
  • Resources

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