WASHINGTON (AP) — The Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol played out for the world to see.

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But the House committee investigating the attack believes a more chilling story has yet to be told.

The 1/6 committee expects Thursday’s prime-time hearing to begin to show that American democracy was put at grave risk.

It will reconstruct how the president, Donald Trump for two more weeks, refused to concede the 2020 election, spread false claims of voter fraud and orchestrated an unprecedented campaign to overturn Joe Biden’s victory.

The public hearings may not change opinions in polarized America.

But the committee’s year-long investigation is intended to stand as a public record for history. A final report aims to provide an accounting of the most violent attack on the Capitol since the British set fire in 1814, and ensure it never happens again.

For full coverage of the Jan. 6 hearings, go to https://www.apnews.com/capitol-siege

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