Be honest.

There have been times over the past few years when the thought of trading in the stresses of your day-to-day existence for a secluded cabin in the mountains or even a grass shack on a deserted island sounded pretty sweet.

It may help to know you're not alone.

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More than 250,000 people already live off the grid in the U.S and that number is expected to grow to as many as 12% by 2035.

But is it possible to stay in your home state and still unplug?

Lawn Starter is out with their list of ‘2023’s Best States to Live Off the Grid’.

The rankings were determined by 23 key factors, like the cost of farmland, the legality of self-generated utilities, and the availability of renewable energy. They also considered indicators like climate, phone connectivity, and access to rural hospitals.

Topping the list is Iowa.

The Hawkeye State is tied for the top spot in generating your own utilities, tied for the second most critical access hospital, and is third in 10-year projected growth in wind power.

Minnesota is also a great place to get off the grid.

The North Star State is number four overall, thanks to the second-lowest natural hazard rate and the fourth-most critical access hospitals.

BEST STATES FOR LIVING OFF THE GRID

  1. Iowa
  2. Texas
  3. Kentucky
  4. Minnesota
  5. Oklahoma
  6. Nebraska
  7. Kansas
  8. North Dakota
  9. Illinois
  10. Montana

How does South Dakota stack up?

The Mount Rushmore State fell just outside of the Top Ten at number 13.

South Dakota's best showings were in the share of electricity produced from renewable sources (2nd), toxic chemicals released per square mile (4th best), and population density in rural areas (8th)

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